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Articles and content related to breastfeeding.

Breastfeeding Anaphylaxis

Anaphylaxis is a severe, systemic allergic reaction that can be potentially life threatening. A massive release of histamine from the tissues causes a drop in blood pressure, narrowing of the airways, and urticaria. Insect stings, nut products, and latex can all cause anaphylaxis in susceptible people. There have also been several cases published describing a similar reaction to some element of breastfeeding.

Safe Use of Birth Control While Breastfeeding

Most women who breastfeed exclusively stop having menstrual periods.This is known as lactational amenorrhea and during lactational amenorrhea, the potential for ovulation is reduced. Subsequently, the chances of conception during this period decrease to approximately 0.5-2%, moreover, there is still a risk of pregnancy. Many women fear that because they are breastfeeding they cannot use any form of contraception. However, the use of contraception should not prevent a mother from breastfeeding.

Safely Managing Pain During Lactation

Pain is the most common reason that patients seek medical attention. Pain is a symptom with an extremely broad differential diagnosis. Effective treatments are based on proper diagnosis. The source, severity, and the cause of the pain need also be considered. There are several analgesics that can be used for a variety of pain syndromes. These include Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), opiates, and non-opiate drugs.

Breastfeeding in Mothers with E. Coli Infections

In the USA and many other countries, the predominant enterohemorrhagic E. coli subtype associated with disease is E. coli O157:H7. Recently, a large number of cases of antibiotic-resistant E. coli O104 have been reported in Germany, some in breastfeeding mothers. This particular species is known to secrete Shiga toxins and to produce potentially severe renal disease in humans. The question has arisen as to whether breastfeeding mothers should continue to breastfeed while undergoing therapy for this severe infection.

Potassium Iodide for Radiation Exposure

Potassium iodide was approved by the Food and Drug Administration(FDA) in 1982 for thyroid protection from radioactive iodine accidents.  Of the many radioactive elements released by nuclear accidents, radioactive Iodine-131 is a major component and a huge risk factor for humans.

High Energy Drinks and Breastfeeding

As Energy drinks gain in popularity, many people, including breastfeeding mothers, are questioning their safety. The high caffeine content in these drinks can be a concern for breastfed infants. While caffeine, when used in moderation, is generally considered safe for most breastfeeding mothers, some infants can be very sensitive to it. 

Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

There has recently been a lot of discussion in the news about the potential hazards of taking antidepressants while pregnant. Some researchers are concerned that they increase the risk of birth defects. Proponents of antidepressants point out, correctly, that depression during pregnancy is also risky and can lead to premature delivery and other complications.

Breastfeeding Protects Against Infection

Results of a new study have just been released regarding breastfeeding and its confirmed protective effect against infections. This is very exciting and up-to-date news. While we all know by know that breastfeeding is beneficial to both the mother and the child, there is still some gray area over how long to breastfeed and what duration of breastfeeding is required to see any measurable difference.

Skin-to-Skin Contact

Initiation of breastfeeding as early as possible is beneficial for the mother and the child, (short-term and long-term); this view is now commonly accepted and commonly practiced. Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) is certainly not a new concept but is not widely known. This is unfortunate since the practice of SSC early after birth and during breastfeeding is highly beneficial.
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