Skip to main content

Articles and content related to breastfeeding.

Breastfeeding and Otitis media In Infants

Otitis media is an infection of the middle ear space, behind the eardrum (tympanic membrane). It is characterized by pain, dizziness, and partial loss of hearing. The prevalence of early-onset otitis media (OM) and repeated OM continues to increase among preschool children in the United States.

Breastfeeding May Protect Infants Against Cancers

Cancer is the leading cause of death among U.S children between infancy and 15 years of age. Approximately 11,210 new cases of pediatric cancer were diagnosed in children 0–14 years of age in 2011. A recent study has suggested important role of breastfeeding in the prevention of certain childhood cancers, such as lymphoblastic leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, neuroblastoma and certain central nervous system cancers.[1] In this study, the researchers found high levels of cancer-fighting TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) in human milk, which may be one of the sources of breast milk's anti-cancer activity.

Breastfeeding May Reduce The Risk Of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome:

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the unexplained death of a seemingly healthy baby, usually during sleep. It is also called as crib death.It is the leading cause of post neonatal death in developed countries and the eighth leading cause of years of potential life lost. A recent meta-analysis has suggested that breastfeeding reduces the risk of sudden infant death syndrome.

Breastfeeding May Decrease The Risk Of Ovarian Cancer

Ovarian cancer is a malignant growth arising from the ovary. In the US almost 20,000 cases of ovarian cancer were reported in 2006. Symptoms may include: bloating, pelvic pain, abdominal pressure, abdominal fullness, swelling, persistent indigestion, change in bowel habits such as constipation, change in bladder habits such as frequent need to urinate, increased abdominal girth and low back pain.

Breastfeeding in Infancy May Reduce the Risk of Major Depression in Adulthood

A recent study has suggested that a history of not being breastfed may be associated with a higher risk of subsequent major depression in adulthood.1 In this study of 52 female and male adults with a diagnosis of major depression, there were also 106 healthy controls who never suffered depression. The authors found that 61 of 84 (72%) subjects had never reported depression, were breastfed.

Increased Risk of Pyloric Stenosis with Formula Feeding with Bottles.

Pyloric stenosis (PS), also known as infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, is caused by hypertrophy of smooth muscles of the pylorus.  The pylorus is the outlet of the stomach and therefore its constriction leads to obstruction, often observed as projectile vomiting in the newborn infant. Its cause is unknown but presents as a palpable mass in right upper quadrant of abdomen. It is a common condition that requires surgery in first few days to months after birth, suggesting that environmental factors could be a trigger.

Use of Methylergonovine in Breastfeeding Mothers

In 2003, a report was published which reviewed the poisoning of newborns by the inadvertent use of intramuscular or oral methylergonovine (at adult doses) directly in infants. Thirty-four cases were reviewed in Belgium where methylergonovine was accidentally administered orally or intramuscularly directly to infants. The intramuscular injections produced severe complications as would be expected.

Revisiting the Benefits of Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding appears to protect infants from infection. In a study by Dewey et al, infants who breastfed had a lower incidence of diarrhea, otitis media (ear infection), and upper respiratory infections in the first year of life. Continued breastfeeding into the second year of life did not decrease the number of illnesses but did shorten the duration of otitis media.

A Review of Codeine Safety and Regulations for the Breastfeeding Mother

The importance of managing maternal postpartum pain is widely recognized. Yet how to provide treatment that is protective of the neonate while simultaneously providing adequate maternal therapy has not been determined. Just under half of the infants born in North America are delivered by cesarean section or vaginally after episiotomy and frequently a regimen containing some form of codeine is prescribed for analgesia.
Subscribe to Breastfeeding