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Articles and content related to breastfeeding.

Breastfeeding in Mothers Who are Carriers of Staphylococcus Aureus

A recent study explored the relationship between maternal colonization (bacteria on the mother’s skin surface) with Methicillin Sensitive Staphylococcus Aureus (MSSA), during pregnancy and delivery to determine the association with infant colonization.[1]  Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of community and hospital acquired sepsis (a serious bacterial infection in the blood).[2] Therefore, recognizing a patient’s colonization with MSSA and the antibiotic resistant form of this bacteria, Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) is important, especially in vulnerable populations such as those babies admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

Breastfeeding And Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. In 1990, the incidence of breast cancer was 5–7 per 100 women in developed countries in patients less than 70 years of age, and 1–2 per 100 in Asian and African countries. Several studies have suggested that breastfeeding may reduce the risk of several types of breast cancers.

Does Breastfeeding Alter the Risk of Asthma in Children?

Asthma is a common chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by recurring symptoms of reversible airflow obstruction and bronchospasm. Symptoms include wheezing, coughing, chest tightness and shortness of breath. A recent study in New Zealand has suggested that breastfeeding may indeed protect against the risk of asthma in children up to 6 years of age.

Breastfeeding In Infancy May Slow Onset Of Adult Schizophrenia.

Schizophrenia is a psychotic disorder, which causes severely impaired thinking, emotions, and unusual behaviors. Schizophrenic patients are typically unable to recognize sensory stimuli and may have enhanced perceptions of sounds, colors, and other features of their environment. Most schizophrenics, if untreated, gradually withdraw from interactions with other people, and lose their ability to take care of personal needs and grooming. A recent, but small study suggests that breastfeeding in infancy may delay the age of onset of schizophrenia.

Breastfeeding May Lower The Risk Of Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease that affects the brain and spinal cord. Episodes can last for days, weeks or months and alternate with periods of reduced or no symptoms at all. Because nerves in any part of the brain or spinal cord may be damaged, patients with multiple sclerosis can have symptoms in many parts of the body such as: loss of balance, painful muscle spasms, numbness, abnormal sensation, tremors, problem in walking and coordination, double vision, vision loss, hearing loss, decreased attention span, poor judgment and memory loss. A new study from Germany suggests that breastfeeding may reduce the risk of multiple sclerosis.

Maternal Probiotic Use during Pregnancy and Breastfeeding May Reduce the Risk of Eczema

A recent study has suggested that use of probiotics in pregnancy and breastfeeding may reduce the risk of eczema in infants. Eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, is the term  broadly applied to a range of persistent skin conditions which include dryness and recurring skin rashes characterized by: redness, skin edema (swelling), itching, crusting, flaking, blistering, cracking, oozing, bleeding and areas of temporary skin discoloration.

Breastfeeding and Otitis media In Infants

Otitis media is an infection of the middle ear space, behind the eardrum (tympanic membrane). It is characterized by pain, dizziness, and partial loss of hearing. The prevalence of early-onset otitis media (OM) and repeated OM continues to increase among preschool children in the United States.

Breastfeeding May Protect Infants Against Cancers

Cancer is the leading cause of death among U.S children between infancy and 15 years of age. Approximately 11,210 new cases of pediatric cancer were diagnosed in children 0–14 years of age in 2011. A recent study has suggested important role of breastfeeding in the prevention of certain childhood cancers, such as lymphoblastic leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, neuroblastoma and certain central nervous system cancers.[1] In this study, the researchers found high levels of cancer-fighting TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) in human milk, which may be one of the sources of breast milk's anti-cancer activity.

Breastfeeding May Reduce The Risk Of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome:

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the unexplained death of a seemingly healthy baby, usually during sleep. It is also called as crib death.It is the leading cause of post neonatal death in developed countries and the eighth leading cause of years of potential life lost. A recent meta-analysis has suggested that breastfeeding reduces the risk of sudden infant death syndrome.
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