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Articles and content related to breastfeeding.

Introduction to Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding is recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics as the exclusive source of nutrition for feeding young infants for the first six months of life. Data suggest that not only are there psychological benefits from its use, but <a href="http://www.infantrisk.com/content/revisiting-benefits-breastfeeding">nutritional, gastrointestinal, and host defense benefits as well</a>. Some women are unable or unwilling to breastfeed and there is nothing wrong with that. However, a woman who desires to breastfeed should know how to access all of the resources available that can help support her efforts.

Inaccurate Information Online Regarding Breastfeeding with Lyme Disease

When faced with a health concern, the first place that many people go is the internet. Although having medical advice at your fingertips is convenient, your search bar may not be the best bet for obtaining accurate information. A study done on the validity of information found online regarding Lyme disease showed that many websites, claiming to be leaders in information regarding Lyme disease, were providing inaccurate information, especially about breastfeeding while infected with Lyme disease.

Drug entry into Human Milk

The amount of a drug that is excreted into breastmilk depends on a number of kinetic factors. Using these kinetic terms, one can frequently estimate the probability that a medications will enter will, but the only true test is the research studies published in the literature. With these in hand we can frequently estimate the absolute dosage an infant will receive from his/her mother's milk.

RED Milk. What causes your milk to turn red?

There are basically two reasons that a mother's milk is red. Sometimes a small rupture in a blood capillary in the nipple or the breast may turn milk pink. The second reason is a bacterium called Serratia marsescens.

Effects of Marijuana on the Fetus and Breastfeeding Infants.

Current studies indicate that approximately 4% of women in the USA use illicit drugs while pregnant. Seventy five percent of these cases report the use of marijuana. Despite the widespread use of this product, the public is not aware of the potential neurobehavioral effects of this drug on the fetus or the newborn infant.

Vitamin D Supplements

A recent study estimated that 1 in 5 Americans are at risk for vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that is naturally present in a handful of foods (e.g. fatty fish or cod liver oil). Vitamin D is also produced in the body after sun exposure and can be obtained from supplements and food additives.

Head Lice

Head lice or Pediculus humanus capitis, attack as many as 12 million children every year. Lice are spread by direct contact with infested hair. Sharing combs, brushes, beds, and hats may also contribute to the spread of these parasites. Lice infestations in the U.S. are more frequent in girls and lead to stigma and absenteeism from school or day care.

Duration of Breastfeeding in the Working Mother

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life and supports the continuation of breastfeeding through the first year of life along with the initiation of other foods. Most mothers make the decision on whether or not they will breastfeed either prior to or during pregnancy. There are many factors that influence a mother 's decision to breastfeed, and the overall length of time she chooses to breastfeed.

Use of Exparel in Breastfeeding Mothers

Recently, the InfantRisk Center was asked to comment on the use of a new, extended-release bupivicaine product called Exparel. This drug is applied to surgical wounds and provides local anasthesia over then next 3-4 days. Some doctors are beginning to use it with C-sections and have some concerns about its safety profile in breastfeeding mothers.
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