Asthma is a common chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by recurring symptoms of reversible airflow obstruction and bronchospasm. Symptoms include wheezing, coughing, chest tightness and shortness of breath.

Schizophrenia is a psychotic disorder, which causes severely impaired thinking, emotions, and unusual behaviors. Schizophrenic patients are typically unable to recognize sensory stimuli and may have enhanced perceptions of sounds, colors, and other features of their environment.

Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease that affects the brain and spinal cord. Episodes can last for days, weeks or months and alternate with periods of reduced or no symptoms at all.

A recent study has suggested that use of probiotics in pregnancy and breastfeeding may reduce the risk of eczema in infants.1 Eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, is the term  broadly applied to a range of persistent skin conditions which include dryness and recurring skin rashes characterized by: redness, skin edema (swelling), itching, crusting, flaking, blistering, cracking, oozing,...

Type 2 diabetes, also known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects systemic glucose metabolism. With type 2 diabetes, one’s body either resists the effects of insulin (a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells),  or the body doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level.

Otitis media is an infection of the middle ear space, behind the eardrum (tympanic membrane). It is characterized by pain, dizziness, and partial loss of hearing. The prevalence of early-onset otitis media (OM) and repeated OM continues to increase among preschool children in the United States.[1]

Cancer is the leading cause of death among U.S children between infancy and 15 years of age. Approximately 11,210 new cases of pediatric cancer were diagnosed in children 0–14 years of age in 2011.

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the unexplained death of a seemingly healthy baby, usually during sleep. It is also called as crib death.It is the leading cause of post neonatal death in developed countries and the eighth leading cause of years of potential life lost.

Ovarian canceris a malignant growth arising from the ovary.   In the US almost 20,000 cases of ovarian cancer were reported in 2006.

Solemn Mom

A recent study has suggested that a history of not being breastfed may be associated with a higher risk of subsequent major depression in adulthood.In this study of 52 female and male adults with a diagnosis of major depression, there were also 106 healthy controls who never suffered depression. The authors found that 61 of 84 (72%) subjects had never reported depression, were...

Pyloric stenosis (PS), also known as infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, is caused by hypertrophy of smooth muscles of the pylorus.  The pylorus is the outlet of the stomach and therefore its constriction leads to obstruction, often observed as projectile vomiting in the newborn infant. Its cause is unknown but presents as a palpable mass in right upper quadrant of abdomen.

In 2003, a report was published which reviewed the poisoning of newborns by the inadvertent use of intramuscular or oral methylergonovine (at adult doses) directly in infants. Thirty-four cases were reviewed in Belgium where methylergonovine was accidentally administered orally or intramuscularly directly to infants.The intramuscular injections produced severe complications as...

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About the InfantRisk Center Team

Dr. Thomas Hale

Thomas Hale, Ph.D., R.Ph., is a professor of pediatrics and associate dean of research at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center and acting executive director of the InfantRisk Center. Hale is considered one of the foremost expert in the field of perinatal pharmacology and the use of medications by pregnant and breastfeeding mothers.

The vision of the InfantRisk Center is to create a new body of drug information concerning the safety of medications and their use during pregnancy and lactation. Additionally, the center will expand, enhance and disseminate knowledge regarding the use of medications and other environmental chemicals by pregnant and breastfeeding women worldwide.


Dr. Christine Garner

Christine D. Garner, PhD, RD, completed her doctorate Nutrition at Cornell University, where she was an NIH Doctoral Trainee in Maternal and Child Nutrition. She was trained as a Registered Dietitian at the University of California San Francisco, where she also worked for several years as a Pediatric Clinical Dietitian.

Garner’s interests involve maternal and child health from a nutritional perspective. The majority of her research has centered on maternal obesity and breastfeeding, and she has used a combination of statistical and qualitative methods to investigate research questions pertaining to these topics.


Dr. Mubariz Naqvi, MD

Dr. Mubariz Naqvi, MD is a long-time member of the Department of Pediatrics. He is a Professor of Pediatrics and is a board certified neonatologist. Dr. Naqvi has spent many years supporting the use of human milk in both term and preterm babies. He is the founder of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Northwest Texas Hospital in Amarillo. He introduced the Neonatal Transport Service, is involved with the Pediatric residency and medical student education, is a member of the Education Research sub-committee, and numerous other hospital and educational committees. He has been designated as a Master Teacher by the Texas Tech Medical School. He is involved in the Outreach Education Program for regional hospitals in the Texas Panhandle. He also conducts follow-up of NICU graduates. Dr. Naqvi is Board Certified by the American Academy of Pediatrics with a Subspecialty Board in Neonatal/Perinatal Medicine.

 

 

Dr. Teresa Baker

Dr. Baker graduated from the University of Texas Southwestern and completed her residency training at Parkland Health and Hospital System in Dallas, TX. She is Board Certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology and is a Fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Dr. Baker has a combined private and academic OB/GYN practice with the University Physicians at Texas Tech Health Sciences Center in Amarillo. She is interested in teen pregnancy, postpartum depression, and promoting preventive medicine for the women of the Texas Panhandle, as well as Resident and Student education and serves as the Residency Director.


Dr. Amanda Griffin MD

Dr. Amanda Griffin MD graduated from University of Nebraska Medical Center and completed her residency training in Pediatrics from Texas Tech University School of Medicine. Her practice includes direct patient care as well as supervision and education of residents and students in the outpatient clinic, newborn nursery, and inpatient ward. She also serves the same roles in a clinic for children with special healthcare needs.

Dr. Griffin also helped establish and presently supervised a breastfeeding clinic in the Department of Pediatrics. She supervises a Board Certified Lactation Consultant and helped expand the access of our patients to lactation services in our community. She is a Pediatric hospitalist and admits and cares for inpatients of private pediatricians in Amarillo.


Dr. Todd Bell

Dr. Todd Bell is an Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics although he is double boarded in Pediatrics and Internal Medicine. He received his MD from the University of Arkansas School of Medicine cum laude in 2001. He completed a combined general internal medicine and general pediatrics residency in Durham, North Carolina at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Bell has extensive research experience, particularly in influenza, infectious diseases, and dysautonomia.

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