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We are back in our offices and ready to take your calls! If you need to discuss medication use while breastfeeding or during pregnancy, please call us at 1 (806) 352-2519. We operate Monday - Friday from 8 AM to 5 PM Central standard time. 

 

 

COVID-19 Vaccinations

The InfantRisk Center has received numerous queries concerning the use of Covid-19 Vaccinations in pregnant and breastfeeding mothers. Below are recommendations from several groups.
Plain Language Summary:
Similar to other medications, pregnant and/or breastfeeding women have not been included in studies to determine how well COVID vaccines work or how safe they are. Based on what we understand from similar vaccines, we believe the risks that come with vaccination will probably be low. Therefore, while we wait for more information, each mother and provider should discuss what choice fits their situation best. The risk and benefit of the vaccine should be compared to each mother’s individual risk for getting COVID-19 as well as how well she is expected to tolerate the disease.

COVID-19 Pandemic Research

COVID-19 Vaccine and Breastfeeding

Researchers at the InfantRisk Center want to know about your experience getting the COVID-19 vaccine while breastfeeding! Help inform other breastfeeding moms and clinicians by completing this research survey.
 
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Breastfeeding with COVID-19 – Safety and Guidelines

Even in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, breastfeeding is still safe and highly recommended. Current guidelines from all of the major health organizations, including the World Health Organization, UNICEF, The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, American Academy of Pediatrics, and the CDC, are in agreement that mothers can and should breastfeed their newborns even if they are positive for COVID-19.

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Pregnancy and childbirth in a pandemic?

Pregnancy and childbirth bring significant life changes, and so has the pandemic! We want to know how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected you and your experiences during pregnancy and childbirth. Please help future moms and babies by completing this research survey.

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Breastfeeding in a Pandemic???

Being a new mom is hard in the best of times. How has COVID-19 impacted your breastfeeding experience? We want to know! Please help future mothers and their babies by taking our research survey.

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Research

Every year my center publishes drugs studies and with information about the transfer of selected drugs into their mothers milk. Take a look at these drugs and see if you might be willing to participate in one of these studies. They are really easy, just collect samples of your milk every few hours, freeze them,  and send them back to my laboratories. We pay for overnight mailing.

 

 

Participate in Research

RECENT ARTICLES

New Study Suggests antidepressants used during pregnancy pose no harm to infant’s brain

A large European study below, further supports our suggestions for some years that the use of antidepressants during pregnancy does not harm the infant’s intellectual capacity later on.

Kratom

Kratom was on the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency’s (DEA) list of drugs of concern since 20051 and was almost reclassified as a Schedule I drug in 2016. The reclassification was eventually put on hold due to massive public outcry and Kratom currently remains legal in most states in the U.S.2 However, there is no question that the number of Kratom exposures in the US is on the rise.

Seafood Consumption During Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

The benefits of fish and shellfish, collectively termed “seafood” as part of a balanced, healthy diet have been described. Seafood is low in saturated fat and a good source of high-quality protein and micronutrients including vitamin B12, vitamin D, calcium, iron, and zinc. It is also an important dietary source of polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) that the human body is unable to make.

Breastfeeding and Lead Contamination

Lead is an environmental pollutant that serves no useful purpose in the body and tends to accumulate in the body's bony structures based on their exposure. Some studies show that the half-life of lead in bone is approximately 27 years.  Thus you may never get rid of all the lead you have absorbed during your life without chelation therapy.  Thus it is best to try and avoid situations with lead exposure. 

Zika Virus Update

At present there is enormous concern about the birth defects believed associated with infections for an old virus called Zika during pregnancy. Information concerning the Zika Virus and its implication in microcephaly has been reported in many countries, including the USA.

Non-Drug Treatments for Depression

Depression during pregnancy and postpartum is fairly common, affecting anywhere from 15% to 25% of women. Antidepressants [link antidepressants] are an important part of the treatment arsenal for depression. But clinicians, and women themselves, are increasingly concerned about their use in pregnancy and while breastfeeding. Specifically, do antidepressants taken during pregnancy cause birth defects?

Effects of Marijuana on the Fetus and Breastfeeding Infants.

Current studies indicate that approximately 4% of women in the USA use illicit drugs while pregnant. Seventy five percent of these cases report the use of marijuana. Despite the widespread use of this product, the public is not aware of the potential neurobehavioral effects of this drug on the fetus or the newborn infant.

Inaccurate Information Online Regarding Breastfeeding with Lyme Disease

When faced with a health concern, the first place that many people go is the internet. Although having medical advice at your fingertips is convenient, your search bar may not be the best bet for obtaining accurate information. A study done on the validity of information found online regarding Lyme disease showed that many websites, claiming to be leaders in information regarding Lyme disease, were providing inaccurate information, especially about breastfeeding while infected with Lyme disease.

Prenatal Vitamins

During pregnancy there is an increased demand for certain vitamins and nutrients to ensure proper and adequate growth of the fetus. Prenatal vitamins generally contain higher levels of <a href="http://www.infantrisk.com/content/folic-acid-overview-metabolism-dosages-and-benefits-optimal-periconception-supplementation">folic acid</a>, iron, and calcium to meet this increased need. &nbsp;It is important to note that prenatal vitamins are not required when these nutrients are obtained through a healthy diet consisting of copious amounts of fruits and vegetables. However, if the patient chooses to supplement her diet with prenatal vitamins, she should first discuss her options with her attending physician to determine suitability. There are many different types of prenatal vitamins, and a physician will be able to discern which one is most appropriate for the patient.