Smiling Mom Breastfeeding

Lead is an environmental pollutant that serves no useful purpose in the body and tends to accumulate in the body's bony structures based on their exposure. Some studies show that the half-life of lead in bone is approximately 27 years.  Thus you may never get rid of all the lead you have absorbed during your life without chelation therapy.

Pregnant Woman Laying Down

At present there is enormous concern about the birth defects believed associated with infections for an old virus called Zika during pregnancy.

Information concerning the Zika Virus and its implication in microcephaly has been reported in many countries,  including the USA.

During pregnancy there is an increased demand for certain vitamins and nutrients to ensure proper and adequate growth of the fetus. Prenatal vitamins generally contain higher levels of folic acid, iron, and calcium to meet this increased need.  It is...

Breastfeeding is recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics as the exclusive source of nutrition for feeding young infants for the first six months of life. Data suggest that not only are there psychological benefits from its use, but nutritional, gastrointestinal, and host defense benefits as well. Some...

Influenza is a viral infection that affects the respiratory tract. It is especially risky in pregnant women and increases the risk of premature delivery, abortion, and stillbirth. (1) Pregnant women are also at an increased risk of complications from the virus.

Sarah has had depression on and off throughout most of her adult life. She finally found an antidepressant that worked for her. But now she’s pregnant and she’s been hearing all the awful things about antidepressants during pregnancy. She’s talked with her doctor about it, and he has assured her that the risk of problems is very small. But he is willing to consider other approaches....

When faced with a health concern, the first place that many people go is the internet. Although having medical advice at your fingertips is convenient, your search bar may not be the best bet for obtaining accurate information.

Mechanisms of Drug Entry into Human Milk

Marijuana Plant

     Current studies indicate that approximately 4% of women in the USA use illicit drugs while pregnant. Seventy five percent of these cases report the use of marijuana. Despite the widespread use of this product, the public is not aware of the potential neurobehavioral effects of this drug on the fetus or the newborn infant.

Migraines affect up to 17% of women of childbearing age. These headaches are usually one sided and are likely to have a pulsatile or throbbing quality. Accompanying features may include nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light or sound. Stress, weather, hunger, menstrual periods, sleep disturbances, light, birth control pills, and certain types of foods can be contributing factors.

There are basically two reasons that a mother's milk is red.  Sometimes a small rupture in a blood capillary in the nipple or the breast may turn milk pink.   The second reason is a bacterium called Serratia marsescens.

Many women are concerned about using insect repellents during pregnancy, however, mosquito borne illnesses can be dangerous during pregnancy. Two examples of mosquito transmitted illnesses are malaria and the west nile virus. Both can be avoided by avoiding mosquito bites. Insect repellents containing DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide) are the most effective and widely used.

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About the InfantRisk Center Team

Dr. Thomas Hale

Thomas Hale, Ph.D., R.Ph., is a professor of pediatrics and associate dean of research at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center and acting executive director of the InfantRisk Center. Hale is considered one of the foremost expert in the field of perinatal pharmacology and the use of medications by pregnant and breastfeeding mothers.

The vision of the InfantRisk Center is to create a new body of drug information concerning the safety of medications and their use during pregnancy and lactation. Additionally, the center will expand, enhance and disseminate knowledge regarding the use of medications and other environmental chemicals by pregnant and breastfeeding women worldwide.


Dr. Christine Garner

Christine D. Garner, PhD, RD, completed her doctorate Nutrition at Cornell University, where she was an NIH Doctoral Trainee in Maternal and Child Nutrition. She was trained as a Registered Dietitian at the University of California San Francisco, where she also worked for several years as a Pediatric Clinical Dietitian.

Garner’s interests involve maternal and child health from a nutritional perspective. The majority of her research has centered on maternal obesity and breastfeeding, and she has used a combination of statistical and qualitative methods to investigate research questions pertaining to these topics.


Dr. Mubariz Naqvi, MD

Dr. Mubariz Naqvi, MD is a long-time member of the Department of Pediatrics. He is a Professor of Pediatrics and is a board certified neonatologist. Dr. Naqvi has spent many years supporting the use of human milk in both term and preterm babies. He is the founder of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Northwest Texas Hospital in Amarillo. He introduced the Neonatal Transport Service, is involved with the Pediatric residency and medical student education, is a member of the Education Research sub-committee, and numerous other hospital and educational committees. He has been designated as a Master Teacher by the Texas Tech Medical School. He is involved in the Outreach Education Program for regional hospitals in the Texas Panhandle. He also conducts follow-up of NICU graduates. Dr. Naqvi is Board Certified by the American Academy of Pediatrics with a Subspecialty Board in Neonatal/Perinatal Medicine.

 

 

Dr. Teresa Baker

Dr. Baker graduated from the University of Texas Southwestern and completed her residency training at Parkland Health and Hospital System in Dallas, TX. She is Board Certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology and is a Fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Dr. Baker has a combined private and academic OB/GYN practice with the University Physicians at Texas Tech Health Sciences Center in Amarillo. She is interested in teen pregnancy, postpartum depression, and promoting preventive medicine for the women of the Texas Panhandle, as well as Resident and Student education and serves as the Residency Director.


Dr. Amanda Griffin MD

Dr. Amanda Griffin MD graduated from University of Nebraska Medical Center and completed her residency training in Pediatrics from Texas Tech University School of Medicine. Her practice includes direct patient care as well as supervision and education of residents and students in the outpatient clinic, newborn nursery, and inpatient ward. She also serves the same roles in a clinic for children with special healthcare needs.

Dr. Griffin also helped establish and presently supervised a breastfeeding clinic in the Department of Pediatrics. She supervises a Board Certified Lactation Consultant and helped expand the access of our patients to lactation services in our community. She is a Pediatric hospitalist and admits and cares for inpatients of private pediatricians in Amarillo.


Dr. Todd Bell

Dr. Todd Bell is an Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics although he is double boarded in Pediatrics and Internal Medicine. He received his MD from the University of Arkansas School of Medicine cum laude in 2001. He completed a combined general internal medicine and general pediatrics residency in Durham, North Carolina at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Bell has extensive research experience, particularly in influenza, infectious diseases, and dysautonomia.

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