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Zika Virus Update

At present there is enormous concern about the birth defects believed associated with infections for an old virus called Zika during pregnancy. Information concerning the Zika Virus and its implication in microcephaly has been reported in many countries, including the USA.

Inaccurate Information Online Regarding Breastfeeding with Lyme Disease

When faced with a health concern, the first place that many people go is the internet. Although having medical advice at your fingertips is convenient, your search bar may not be the best bet for obtaining accurate information. A study done on the validity of information found online regarding Lyme disease showed that many websites, claiming to be leaders in information regarding Lyme disease, were providing inaccurate information, especially about breastfeeding while infected with Lyme disease.

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as the state of carbohydrate (glucose) intolerance that has its onset or first recognition during late pregnancy and has many similarities to non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). GDM presents in two forms. The terms “overt” and “gestational diabetes” are used to describe the type of GDM, and are based primarily on gestational age at diagnosis.

Depression in Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Clinical depression is more than just sadness. Although there are clear patterns, the symptoms can be very different from person to person. The most common symptom is called “anhedonia,” or no longer taking pleasure in fun activities. Some people become insomniacs, some sleep most of the day. Other people start abusing drugs and alcohol, while some simply get irritable and short-tempered. No lab or imaging tests can help diagnose depression, only the clinical judgment of a health-care practitioner. There are several clinical tools available to help diagnose depression.

Poisonous Protein: Breastfeeding and Pregnancy with PKU

Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an inherited metabolic disorder in which an affected person is less able to process the amino acid phenylalanine. Abnormally high levels of phenylalanine in the blood and tissues can cause a variety of toxic effects, including brain damage. All infants born in hospitals in the United States, and much of the rest of the first world, are routinely tested for PKU. With proper dietary management, most PKU patients have good outcomes.1

Does Breastfeeding Alter the Risk of Asthma in Children?

Asthma is a common chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by recurring symptoms of reversible airflow obstruction and bronchospasm. Symptoms include wheezing, coughing, chest tightness and shortness of breath. A recent study in New Zealand has suggested that breastfeeding may indeed protect against the risk of asthma in children up to 6 years of age.

Maternal Probiotic Use during Pregnancy and Breastfeeding May Reduce the Risk of Eczema

A recent study has suggested that use of probiotics in pregnancy and breastfeeding may reduce the risk of eczema in infants. Eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, is the term  broadly applied to a range of persistent skin conditions which include dryness and recurring skin rashes characterized by: redness, skin edema (swelling), itching, crusting, flaking, blistering, cracking, oozing, bleeding and areas of temporary skin discoloration.

Increased Risk of Pyloric Stenosis with Formula Feeding with Bottles.

Pyloric stenosis (PS), also known as infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, is caused by hypertrophy of smooth muscles of the pylorus.  The pylorus is the outlet of the stomach and therefore its constriction leads to obstruction, often observed as projectile vomiting in the newborn infant. Its cause is unknown but presents as a palpable mass in right upper quadrant of abdomen. It is a common condition that requires surgery in first few days to months after birth, suggesting that environmental factors could be a trigger.
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