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New Study Suggests antidepressants used during pregnancy pose no harm to infant’s brain

A large European study below, further supports our suggestions for some years that the use of antidepressants during pregnancy does not harm the infant’s intellectual capacity later on.

Non-Drug Treatments for Depression

Depression during pregnancy and postpartum is fairly common, affecting anywhere from 15% to 25% of women. Antidepressants [link antidepressants] are an important part of the treatment arsenal for depression. But clinicians, and women themselves, are increasingly concerned about their use in pregnancy and while breastfeeding. Specifically, do antidepressants taken during pregnancy cause birth defects?

Depression in Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Clinical depression is more than just sadness. Although there are clear patterns, the symptoms can be very different from person to person. The most common symptom is called “anhedonia,” or no longer taking pleasure in fun activities. Some people become insomniacs, some sleep most of the day. Other people start abusing drugs and alcohol, while some simply get irritable and short-tempered. No lab or imaging tests can help diagnose depression, only the clinical judgment of a health-care practitioner. There are several clinical tools available to help diagnose depression.

Bright Light Therapy for Depression

Some people dread the change of seasons. Shorter, darker days mean fatigue, oversleeping, too many carbs, and having a general sense of malaise: a pattern known as seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Seasonal affective disorder is depression that occurs during late fall and winter months, as darkness occurs earlier in the day. Symptoms include depression, lethargy, difficulty waking, and craving carbohydrates, which often leads to weight gain. Seasonal depression may be an issue for some of the women we see. Fortunately, safe treatments for pregnant and breastfeeding women are available.
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