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What can I take?

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  • What can I take?

    Help! I'm having incredible anxiety and panic attacks nearly every night. They don't usually happen during the day but night time seems to trigger them. My 21mo th old still breastfeeds but sleeps through the night so there's no middle of the night nursing. My doctor won't prescribe anything until I wean him but I don't want to do that. I've been suffering through since I've been pregnant and a couple of glasses of wine do help take a bit of the edge off but frankly it's starting to work less and I'm not willing to down a whole bottle every night. Can you please tell me some safe options for anti anxiety? I just need something to take a couple of times a week when they get really bad. A lot of the times I can suffer through but I need something for when my throat starts closing up and I can't control it. Thank you!

  • #2
    Hi, thanks for your post.

    Anxiety is generally treated with a combination of a benzodiazepine (e.g. Ativan, Xanax, Valium, Klonopin, etc) and an SSRI (e.g. Cymbalta, Zoloft, etc). Both of these drug classes are compatible with breastfeeding as long as you are careful and watch your baby for signs of sedation. With a 21mo old, he already gets less milk relative to his body weight than an infant, so the risks from any medication will be significantly reduced in your situation. Start with this post below and write us back if it doesn't answer your question. We would be willing to talk to your doctor as well.

    https://www.infantrisk.com/forum/showthread.php?1926-Lorazepam-while-breastfeeding-27-month-old

    For anyone reading this, please post again or call us at the InfantRisk Center, (806)352-2519, if this has not completely answered your question. I would also appreciate you filling out a 2 minute survey about your time on the forum:

    https://tthsclubbock.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_bJzhyKVSivVkQZL&Counselor=Web

    -James Abbey, MD

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    • #3
      Hi! Thank you so much for the relpy. This was my post. My doctor has me jumping through hoops trying to get something that will help. I've called the help line and relayed the information. She asked me to call my Lil ones pediatrician and they said I should have stopped breastfeeding at 12 months :/ She's called the infant risk hotline and, after speaking with them, she still refuses to prescribe anything. She's now waiting to call my los pediatrician (who'se on vacation for another week but it doesn't matter because I know what they'll say.)I've had her as my primary for many years and she knows about my sometimes debilitating anxiety issues and now, when I've waited until my lo is older, and suffered through for so long for the sake of his health she's unwilling to help me. I'm at a loss. I don't do well with Xanax but valium has always worked for me. If I can take a medium dose after he goes to bed (sttn) would that be okay? But I'm willing to try anything to help curb the physical throat closing not breathing scary attacks I get. Please help! I'll even take recommendations for another physician in my area. I'm do disappointed in mine. She also refuses to increase my synthroid even when my levels are off. "Let's take another test in eight weeks then we'll reevaluate. " I here that a lot.

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      • #4
        *hear that a lot not here. My grammar is usually better but autocorrect gets in the way sometimes

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        • #5
          The current legal framework allows us to provide and publish information, but that's it. The primary care physician always knows more about the patient's situation than we do and it is our policy not to engage in conflicts with our clients' providers. If you are not satisfied with your care, you are within your rights to switch providers. Consider the pros and cons of that move carefully before you do it.

          You might also consider seeking out some cognitive behavioral therapy. Good evidence indicates that this technique can provide significant relief to someone suffering from a panic disorder. This is no risk of medication exposure with CBT.

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