In 2003, a report was published which reviewed the poisoning of newborns by the inadvertent use of intramuscular or oral methylergonovine (at adult doses) directly in infants. Thirty-four cases were reviewed in Belgium where methylergonovine was accidentally administered orally or intramuscularly directly to infants.The intramuscular injections produced severe complications as...

Breastfeeding appears to protect infants from infection. In a study by Dewey et al, infants who breastfed had a lower incidence of diarrhea, otitis media (ear infection), and upper respiratory infections in the first year of life. Continued breastfeeding into the second year of life did not decrease the number of illnesses but did shorten the duration of otitis media.[1]

Extreme temperatures have the potential to alter the effectiveness of medications. Drugs should not be stored in areas where the temperature may exceed 86 degrees or drop below 58 degrees. Both prescription and over-the-counter medications are at risk for loss of potency and changes in chemical structure if not stored properly.

Breastfeeding Baby

The importance of managing maternal postpartum pain is widely recognized. Yet how to provide treatment that is protective of the neonate while simultaneously providing adequate maternal therapy has not been determined.

Anaphylaxis is a severe, systemic allergic reaction that can be potentially life threatening. A massive release of histamine from the tissues causes a drop in blood pressure, narrowing of the airways, and urticaria. Insect stings, nut products, and latex can all cause anaphylaxis in susceptible people.

Most women who breastfeed exclusively stop having menstrual periods. This is known as lactational amenorrhea.  During lactational amenorrhea, the potential for ovulation is reduced.  Subsequently, the chances of conception during this period decrease to approximately 0.5-2%, moreover, there is still a risk of pregnancy.  Many women fear that because they are breastfeeding...

Pages

About the InfantRisk Center Team

Dr. Thomas Hale

Thomas Hale, Ph.D., R.Ph., is a professor of pediatrics and associate dean of research at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center and acting executive director of the InfantRisk Center.

Hale is considered one of the foremost expert in the field of perinatal pharmacology and the use of medications by pregnant and breastfeeding mothers.

The vision of the InfantRisk Center is to create a new body of drug information concerning the safety of medications and their use during pregnancy and lactation. Additionally, the center will expand, enhance and disseminate knowledge regarding the use of medications and other environmental chemicals by pregnant and breastfeeding women worldwide.


Dr. Teresa Baker


Dr. Baker graduated from the University of Texas Southwestern and completed her residency training at Parkland Health and Hospital System in Dallas, TX. She is Board Certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology and is a Fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Dr. Baker has a combined private and academic OB/GYN practice with the University Physicians at Texas Tech Health Sciences Center in Amarillo. She is interested in teen pregnancy, postpartum depression, and promoting preventive medicine for the women of the Texas Panhandle, as well as Resident and Student education and serves as the Residency Director.

MommyMeds App Image

Our partners