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Articles and content related to breastfeeding.

Skin Care for Acne

Adult acne during pregnancy and breastfeeding is a common problem. Under these circumstances, the adrenal glands secrete higher levels of androgen hormones that cause the sebaceous glands in the skin to increase in size and production. The extra oil clogs the enlarged pores and promotes the growth of bacteria, especially Propionibacterium acnes.

Alcohol and Breastfeeding

While the consumption of alcohol is well known by the medical community as a potential hazard to a fetus, alcohol use during lactation is commonly a gray area for breastfeeding mothers. This article strives to clarify the extent to which a mother can safely use alcohol without adverse effects to her infant. 

Addiction and Substance Abuse

The evolution of the human brain is a relatively recent occurrence in the world. There are “reward circuits” in the brain, specifically dopaminergic pathways in the mesolimbic system, that provide positive reinforcement for a variety of activities that favor human survival. In modern society, people are free to pursue all kinds of fun things that have nothing to do with keeping them alive.

Caffeine Intake in Pregnant and Breastfeeding Women

Caffeine is the most commonly consumed drug in the world. It occurs naturally in many plants and is chemically added to a wide variety of products. Most coffees, sodas, teas, and chocolates, as well as some medications, contain caffeine. Many women are in the habit of consuming caffeine before they become pregnant and want to know if it is safe for their baby before they continue.

Poisonous Protein: Breastfeeding and Pregnancy with PKU

Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an inherited metabolic disorder in which an affected person is less able to process the amino acid phenylalanine. Abnormally high levels of phenylalanine in the blood and tissues can cause a variety of toxic effects, including brain damage. All infants born in hospitals in the United States, and much of the rest of the first world, are routinely tested for PKU. With proper dietary management, most PKU patients have good outcomes.1

Breastfeeding Challenges with G6PD: Not as Bad as it Looks

G6PD deficiency is a metabolic disorder in which an enzyme in red blood cells, Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase, does not work as well as it should. This deficiency makes the blood begins to break down during periods of significant oxidative stress, such as after ingestion of certain drugs and foods.

Oral Glucose Gel May be Effective Treatment for Neonatal Hypoglycemia

Neonatal hypoglycemia (low blood sugar in a new baby) is a common problem in hospital nurseries. Some infants can have low blood sugar and show no symptoms, others become jittery and may feed poorly, and in severe cases, the infant may suffer brain damage or have developmental delay. Hospitals routinely screen babies that are at risk for hypoglycemia by testing for glucose levels in blood obtained from a heel stick. While a symptomatic baby with low glucose clearly needs treatment, there is some debate about what glucose level needs intervention if the baby appears well.

Breastfeeding in Mothers Who are Carriers of Staphylococcus Aureus

A recent study explored the relationship between maternal colonization (bacteria on the mother’s skin surface) with Methicillin Sensitive Staphylococcus Aureus (MSSA), during pregnancy and delivery to determine the association with infant colonization.[1]  Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of community and hospital acquired sepsis (a serious bacterial infection in the blood).[2] Therefore, recognizing a patient’s colonization with MSSA and the antibiotic resistant form of this bacteria, Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) is important, especially in vulnerable populations such as those babies admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

Breastfeeding And Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. In 1990, the incidence of breast cancer was 5–7 per 100 women in developed countries in patients less than 70 years of age, and 1–2 per 100 in Asian and African countries. Several studies have suggested that breastfeeding may reduce the risk of several types of breast cancers.
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